Masoud Saman, M.D.

Dr. Saman, Philosophy

I have always appreciated beauty in all its forms and for as far back as I can remember, I have been in awe of the human form, especially the face; the complex folds of the ear, the gentle contours of the nose, the peaks, valleys and outlines of our lips, and the gentle flows, angles, and seamless transitions that make each and every face unique.

We face the world with our faces and in large part, we build our perceptual identity around our faces. The slightest furrow of the brows, the pout of the lips, or the squint of the eyes can convey subtle sentiments that words may not. Our every scar, line, or blemish tells a story.

But what happens when our faces convey a message that does not reflect our internal sense of self? Perhaps the hollowing around the eyes makes us appear tired when we are in fact well-rested. Or when the lines on our foreheads make us appear older than we are or feel. How do we deal with a portion of the face that is not in harmony with the rest of our face or simply does not “match our look”? Where millimeters make miles of difference in the message conveyed and the impression made, aesthetic precision delivers results.

Driven by a passion for these philosophical and artistic nuances, I pursued a calling to become a Facial Plastic Surgeon.

In my work, I assess and obsess over every detail of the face. I work diligently to correct contours, modify or accentuate curves, restore function, and to polish the diamond in the rough, so to speak. I am proud to say that revealing, restoring, and improving facial grace, curves, contours, and beauty is my calling and my craft. And I work tirelessly to achieve the best results possible for my patients.

no one's got time for downtime

In the day and age of weekly new trends, hypes, products, techniques, and technologies all claiming they “really work”, public demand for the “latest and the greatest” has caused an attention shift from a customized result-focused treatment plan to a trend-, product-, or technology-focused approach. Most cosmetic practices, Med Spas, and other facilities where aesthetic treatments are offered utilize single-modality treatment for a given problem. Although there is a place for this à la carte medicine, in most cases for best results a custom-tailored approach is most optimal.

Result-focused treatment

Although I utilize the most cutting-edge technologies and highest quality products in my practice, I am a believer that time-tested, sound and safe aesthetic principles must be kept front and centered when treating my patients. There are a plethora of excellent surgical and non-surgical modalities available to address many cosmetic concerns. What does not exist (as of yet) is a magic wand that fixes all problems without any of the risks. For this reason, it is imperative to spend ample time to analyze every patient’s area of concern to effectively offer a treatment plan that will provide the most outstanding results in the safest possible way. 

Let’s take the problem of dark under-eye circles as an example. Although the use of dermal fillers (the most commonly offered treatment for this problem in most aesthetic centers) may improve the appearance of dark circles in some patients, there are a number of factors that come into play to provide the best, most optimized treatment. A holistic approach must be employed, understanding a patient’s skin type and skin care regimen, sleep habits, dietary and water intake, allergies, and genetics. Then a customized treatment can then be offered that may be a combination of skin resurfacing, topical skin bleaching, collagen induction, dermal fillers, or other modalities. Risks and benefits of each treatment will be discussed to optimize treatment and excellent results can be delivered. That is the Result-Focused difference: a truly tailored treatment plan for each individual patient.

Education and Training

My passions have always been varied. I have always enjoyed both the right brain and left brain subjects and activities. During undergraduate years, I struggled with consolidating my interests in visual and cinematic arts, theater, philosophy, and human studies with my curiosity for natural sciences, physics, and psychology. And although academic plans called for a rigid decision between a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science, I wanted the flexibility to study both! I attended the University of Texas at Dallas where I majored in Neuroscience, the science of the human brain, cognition, and behavior and later became interested in medicine, the art, and science of maintaining and improving human well-being. 

Subsequently, I took time off to study at the Universite de Paris where I studied French Language and Humanities. Amazing experiences ensued which led to many months of backpacking in Europe during which time I worked as a part-time street musician (I dabbling in playing flamenco guitar). Upon my return, I enrolled at the University of Texas Medical School in San Antonio. 

During my first year, one evening while having dinner at a restaurant with my then-girlfriend and now my wife who at the time was a dental student, the young Syrian man who waited on us told us about his struggle with being born with a cleft lip. He said the facial anomaly was not repaired until he was 9 years old and he spent many years of his life in shame and isolation because of it. I felt that the meeting was a turning point in my life. My wife and I both moved by his compelling story immediately knew a life dedicated to improving facial anomalies was our calling. In 2006, we established a non-profit organization called Chance to Smile, a student-run organization to provide education, social support, and medical care for individuals born with cleft lip and palate. By 2007, we had over 100 members. 

The course of my career had become clear. A sense of purpose overtook me. I had finally found my calling in a career that would consolidate my artistic interests and my penchant for the sciences for a higher good. I knew I wanted to become a facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon. My wife pursued her training in pediatric dentistry with specialized training in cleft lip and palate care.

I was all in. We organized medical mission trips to Mexico and Nicaragua to volunteer medical services where I had the privilege of working under the great late Fernando Ortiz Monasterio; created support groups and registries for affected families in South Texas and provided educational programs for local health practitioners. That year, I was humbled by being peer-nominated and inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society in part for these efforts. In 2006, I received a Fellowship from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and completed a research fellowship at Harvard Medical School. I then traveled to Sevilla, Spain to complete a clinical rotation in facial cosmetic surgery. 

Upon my return, I matched into the prestigious New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai to continue my training in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in Manhattan. Having worked with surgeons from varied training backgrounds prior to going to New York, I did not want to be pigeonholed into one specialty. I sought out the training and mentorship of specialists in plastic surgery, oculoplastic surgery, maxillofacial surgery, dermatologic surgery, and head and neck surgery. I had the privileged opportunity to learn from some of the pioneers in these fields who were gracious enough to open their operating room doors to me and share their wisdom with me. In particular, I am indebted to Donald Wood-Smith, M.D., the Chairman of the Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary for his mentorship. 

During my training, I used my vacation and elective times to travel the country to further my training. I had the opportunity to complete a mini-fellowship with John Mulliken, M.D. at Boston Children’s Hospital. In 2012, I was selected into the highly coveted facial plastic and reconstructive surgery advanced training program for an additional year of specialized training under the auspices of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. During that year alone, I performed over two thousand head and neck and facial plastic and reconstructive surgeries, including microvascular head and neck reconstructive surgeries.

In complement to my interest in facial plastic surgery, during residency training, I developed a passion for head and neck cancer surgery. I sought additional specialized training in the field of head and neck oncologic surgery and currently serve as the Director of Head and Neck Oncologic and Reconstructive Surgery at Medical City Hospitals.

I love to teach and currently serve as faculty for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery for surgeons in training. In addition, I teach facial reconstructive surgery for the international foundation for craniomaxillofacial trauma surgery, AOCMF.

Having completed formal training and being board certified in both head and neck cancer surgery and facial plastic surgery have equipped me with a unique understanding of the human facial anatomy and function. I came back to DFW in 2014 and have been in practice since then and take pride in providing my patients with a higher standard and an exclusive experience for the best aesthetic and functional results possible.

*Individual results are not guaranteed and may vary from person to person. Images may contain models.